Business Litigation

Breach of Fiduciary Duty

A fiduciary relationship refers to a special relationship where one party assumes a higher standard of care, loyalty and duty of good faith towards

the other party. There are several types of fiduciary relationships, including:

  • Corporate officers and stockholders
  • Attorneys and clients
  • Trustees and beneficiaries
  • Guardian and ward
  • Principle and agent
  • Partners to one another

There are several ways a fiduciary may breach their duty of loyalty and good faith. Common breaches of fiduciary duty include self-dealing, mismanagement, commingling assets, embezzlement, improper use of funds, profiting at the fiduciary’s expense, concealing information, and failing to disclose information.

If you intend on bringing, or defending against a breach of fiduciary duty claim, the business litigators at Miller Trial Law are here to help.

Insurers are routinely involved in litigation concerning the meaning, scope and application of their policies. 

Breach of contract litigation is perhaps the most common type of business litigation. It is also the most widely recognized. Contracts govern virtually every area of business. 

A fiduciary relationship refers to a special relationship where one party assumes a higher standard of care, loyalty and duty of good faith towards the other party. 

Employment litigation is a general category within business litigation that describes a number of different employment disputes.

Real estate disputes are those that arise out of the ownership, transaction, or interest in real property. 

Partnerships generally start with good intentions and like-minded expectations. However, it is not uncommon for business partnerships to devolve as infighting and unilateral misconduct threatens the relationship